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Sterilisation

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Sterilisation

Spaying and Neutering Sterilisation is known as Spaying (Ovario-Hysterectomy) in the female dog and cat and as Castration (Neutering) in the male of the species.

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terilisation has a primary function in controlling unwanted populations - we recommend that all household dogs and cats be sterilised before they old enough to begin breeding. Even in the case of secure households - having a 'bitch' on-heat - can become messy due to oestral bleeding and can attract male dogs for miles-around who can create a problem outside the property. Owning an unsprayed bitch may be in contravention of certain local by-laws as well.

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bitch/dog will come on-heat from 6mnths age (up to 12-14 months in larger breed dogs), and will then come on-heat every 6 months. They stay on heat for up to 3 weeks long and Oestrus is characterised but swelling of the vulva and an initial bloody discharge (which can be quite profuse) and becomes a clearer discharge later in the oestral period. Dogs can breed at this early age. Spaying will prevent the signs of heat.

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cat/queen will come on heat from 5 months and will stay on heat until mated. Cats can have quite strange behaviours due to oestrus including abnormal affection and "calling for a mate" - which can be socially demanding!

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arly Age Sterilisation (Pre-pubertal Gonadectomy) - this is sterilising in the 8-16 week age bracket - also to reduce the population numbers of unwanted pets. Animal Welfare Societies and Shelters have introduced it because people who adopt animals are unco-operative in getting their pets sterilised. This allows the Welfare groups to have the dogs/cats sterilised before they are adopted.

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e have always regarded that the optimum age for sterilisation is between 5-7mnths due to anaesthetic and surgical constraints - but scientific data is slowly accumulating that early-age sterilisation is just as safe and successful Possible complications are: effect on urethral diameter in male cats (leading to FLUTD and blacked bladders); Obesity; Urine Incontinence; and Growth Stunting - but there has been no documented proof of adverse effects so far.

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terilisation in male dogs and cats has the added benefit of reducing aggression and less territorial dominance (marking territory and fight wounds/abscesses).

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edical reasons for spaying: oestrogen plays a strong role in the cause of mammary tumours - which can be regarded as fatal cancers - since they tend to spread (metastasise) quite early to the lungs. Spaying before first heat has strong protective qualities against mammary cancer- reducing incidence of cancer to 0.5%.The risk factors increase to 8% when spayed after first heat and to 26% if spayed after 2 or more cycles (or even pregnancy).

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edical reasons for castration: the intact male dog has a very high incidence of Prostatic Infection / Cysts and eventually Prostatic Cancer. This also has a strong hormonal origin (testosterone) and early age castration has a protective function.

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